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Grain performance​​ 2017- 2018 crop year


​Thunder ​Bay​Vancouver​Eastern Canada​Western Canada​​US Destinations​Total
​​Metric Tonnes​​​​
​​Week 43, May 20 - 2640,940
271,911
15,655
17,129
122,511
468,146
  • CP is maintaining momentum through spring seeding, with our four-week rolling average up 18 percent over last year. The operations team spotted 4,161 cars to elevators. The potential for labour impacts aside, CP's network is positioned well to respond to what shippers indicate will be high demand in coming weeks.
  • Overall volume is 1% higher crop-year over crop-year.
​​Week 42, May 13 - 19105,646
230,052
14,809
4,606
114,423
469,536
  • For a third consecutive week, CP spotted more than 5,000 empty grain cars in the country, with 5,291 in Week 42. Tonnage numbers were down 22% at 469,536, as many farmers turned their focus to seeding.
  • CP expects continued soft demand for at least another week. As a result, the operations team is spotting some dedicated trains to elevators early, and placing some empty railcars into storage. CP is positioned well to meet demand going forward.
  • Total tonnage remains 1% higher year over year, and the four-week rolling average is 6% higher than it was a year prior.
​​Week 41, May 6 - 12143,520
346,594
7,687
4,314
100,028
602,143
  • With a second consecutive week above the 600,000-metric-tonne mark, and 5,620 cars spotted to elevators, CP's network is delivering grain efficiently in concert with our supply chain partners. We are well positioned to keep this momentum going.
  • Overall volume is 1% higher crop-year over crop-year.
  • The rolling four-week average is -1% versus last year.
​​Week 40, April 29 - May 5114,190
357,405
10,100
20,168
132,595
634,458
  • Grain shipments this week were the strongest of the calendar year and among the best of the crop year, with 634,458 metric tonnes delivered. This represents an improvement of 36% from last week and 9% over the same week last year.
  • Train cycle times are accelerating, the fleet is balanced between loads and empties, and terminals at both Thunder Bay and Vancouver are efficiently unloading cars. With the supply chain functioning smoothly, CP spotted 5,667 empty cars to country elevators.
  • Overall volume is even with last year. The rolling four-week average is -12% versus last year.
​​Week 39, April 22 - 28 134,947
229,405
4,888
17,205
79,020
465,465
  • CP is emerging from a transition week following a network shutdown and restart in Week 38. Shipments were down 9.2% from a week prior, and empty order placement came in at 4,464.
  • Our loaded train dwell time at country elevators improved 40 percent, and our pipelines to Vancouver and Thunder Bay are charged. The network is now fully reset and ready to handle large volumes. We anticipate a productive May, and appreciate shippers’ efforts to load and unload 24/7 to optimize the grain supply chain.
  • Overall volume is flat vs. last crop year at this time.
  • The rolling four-week average is down 18 percent vs. last year.
​​Week 38, April 15 - 2172,792
304,097
14,648
6,355
114,785
512,677
  • Shipments rose over last week by 4% to 512,677 metric tonnes, making Week 38 the best so far of the calendar year. CP achieved this milestone despite shutting down and restarting our network Friday on account of an anticipated work stoppage. CP placed 4,456 empty cars at elevators
  • We are starting to see momentum build at Thunder Bay terminals. Meanwhile, CP's network is recovering well from last Friday's restart
  • Overall volume is flat crop-year over crop-year
  • The rolling four-week average is down 16% versus last year
​​Week 37, April 8 - 14117,989
248,874
14,260
14,684
96,028
491,835
  • Shipments rose 7.4% from the week prior. Overall volume crop-year to date remains 1 percent higher than last year at the same time. Empty railcar placements in Week 37 came in at 4,257. The rolling four-week average is down 11% vs. a year prior. Our deliveries at this time last year were very strong, prior to dropping off sharply in mid-May, and year-over-year comparisons in coming weeks will reflect that.
  • In anticipation of a potential work stoppage by members of the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, CP has begun implementing a plan to stage trains across our network. We continue to negotiate with these two unions, assisted by a federal mediator. 
​​Week 36, April 1 - 7 83,129
262,039
10,328
16,332
85,699
457,527
  • CP posted its best-yet week in calendar year 2018 for empty placements at country elevators, with 4,657 hoppers delivered. 
  • CP's network remains fluid, and the program to Thunder Bay is growing. Shipments were down by 7.5% from the week prior, partially impacted by Easter Sunday statutory holiday closure at the Port of Vancouver.
  • Overall volume for the crop year remains 2% higher over the prior crop year at Week 36.
  • The rolling four-week average is -6% versus last year.
​​Week 35, March 25 - March 31100,442
252,568
12,246
6,464
123,362
495,082
  • CP continues to post solid grain numbers, with 495,082 metric tonnes delivered in Week 35. We remain 2% ahead of last year's to-date tonnage at Week 35, and down just 2% from last week's best-in-calendar-year tonnage figure. Network fluidity continues to improve week by week.  
  • We added 18 high-horsepower locomotives to our fleet in the second half of March as part of our resourcing plan described in our letter to ministers Garneau and MacAulay. These units will support transport of all commodities and help to improve overall network fluidity. Additionally, in early April, we launched an additional daily train in each direction in the Calgary-Moose Jaw-St. Paul corridor, which will create more capacity for manifest grain moves.
  • Total car placements were lower in Week 35 at 3,524 railcars, as strong billings over the past few weeks have CP's fleet heavily under load, reducing the empty cars available to be spotted. Though dwell times at origin continue to improve, the high number of loaded cars has led to some cars experiencing longer than normal delays. Expect continued improvement with rising network fluidity.
  • The rolling four-week average is flat vs. last year.
  • The Port of Thunder Bay reopened March 28. Grain volumes to that destination continue to grow, which will assist with car velocity and overall loading in coming weeks.
  • CP continues to monitor and watch both potential flooding threats across our network, as well as potential avalanche conditions through the mountains in British Columbia. Materials and equipment have been strategically placed to allow for timely cleanup and recovery of the track infrastructure should an outage or event occur.
​​Week 34, March 18 - 2461,076
277,052
44,571
10,124
111,904
504,727
  • The overall fluidity of CP's rail network continued to improve in Week 34, translating into a strong week of total car placements of 4,481 railcars, another week-over-week increase.
  • Total grain tonnages were up just over 13% over Week 33 at 504,727 metric tonnes, the highest this calendar year. Year to date, we're 3 percent higher than where we were last crop year at Week 34.
  • Grain volumes to Vancouver are rising. Additionally, train movements to Thunder Bay have begun, and vessels should begin calling at the port this coming week.
  • The rolling four-week average is now 1% lower vs. last year.
  • Some loaded railcars and unit trains are continuing to experience longer dwell times than normal; we are making progress in tackling this issue.
  • CP continues to monitor and watch both potential flooding threats across our network as well as potential Avalanche conditions through the mountains in British Columbia. Materials and equipment have been strategically placed to allow for timely clean-up and recovery of the track infrastructure should an outage or event occur.
​​Week 33, March 11 - 17 14,351
307,985
9,602
12,798
100,634
445,273
  • Overall fluidity on CP's network continued to rise through Week 33, with all measures of throughput and velocity at seven-week highs. The benefit to grain movement is visible primarily in empty car placement numbers for bulk grain, which stands at 4,360, or 5 percent higher than last week's 4,149, and a third straight week of improvement  – a statistic that bodes well for tonnage numbers in Week 34. This week's empty placement number is the highest of the 2018 calendar year.
  • Despite these improvements, grain tonnage numbers were down 8 percent from Week 32 (the highest week thus far in Calendar Year 2018), and stand at 445,273.
  • Export terminals at the Port of Vancouver handled large volumes in Week 33. As volumes continue to increase, it is critical that terminals in Vancouver operate 24/7, and that the supply chain works together to manage overall throughput.
  • Overall volume is 3 percent higher this crop-year over last, a positive difference of 440,000 tonnes.
  • The rolling four-week average is down 7 percent vs. last year (again, heavily influenced by a particularly difficult Week 30).
  • Some loaded railcars and unit trains are experiencing unusually long dwell times. With the improvements in velocity on our network, we are working hard to tackle this issue and have begun moving those cars and trains toward destination.
  • CP continues our efforts to foster a positive dialogue with our customers, and are working directly with them to make sure we understand their needs while keeping them informed of developments on our end.
  • CP continues to closely watch the emerging flooding threat across our network as snow begins to melt. We will strategically place material and equipment at yards as necessary so we're prepared to shore up or repair our roadbeds should conditions warrant it. CP's avalanche monitoring and control program continues to work closely with all stakeholders through B.C.'s main mountainous transportation corridor. Working with BC Highways and Parks Canada in all avalanche control activities, and constantly monitoring present and forecasted weather conditions that may adversely affect the corridor to ensure timely, efficient and safe movement of freight.
  • You can read our letter to Transport Minister Garneau and Agriculture Minister MacAulay updating them on the status of our network at http://www.cpr.ca/en/about-cp/cp-and-public-policy/letter-to-the-ministers
​​Week 32, March 4 - 10541
364,787
16,255
3,862
98,208
483,653
  • CP's network continues to recover. Total daily network throughput for all commodities, measured in gross ton-miles, rose 5%, and has risen by more than 14% since mid-February.  Commodities moving on CP are showing improved transit times as the network normalizes.
  • In Week 32, CP moved 22% more grain than a week prior. CP moved 484,000 metric tonnes of Canadian grain in Week 32, the highest weekly volumes since Week 21.
  • CP continues to take exception to the Ag Transport Coalition's representation of weekly order fulfilment performance, and maintains that total weekly grain tonnage represents the most accurate measure of grain system performance.  More than three-quarters of CP's system-wide grain business uses the Dedicated Train Program (DTP), which allows customers to control their own train assets for a set period of time. In other words, DTP customers use the capacity they need when they need it, including the ability to transfer it between our U.S. and Canadian grain network. Trying to compare DTP performance to an "order fulfillment" model, as the Ag Transport Coalition does, simply does not work, because there are no weekly car orders associated with DTP. DTP places the origin and destination selection of trains in the control of the grain company. Once the trainload capacity needs of the shipper is agreed upon, like in a service agreement, CP has an obligation to provide that capacity and the shipper has the reciprocal obligation to use that capacity.
  • As such, CP has not provided empty car placement information in past weekly updates. However, in an effort to quell misleading information regarding the trend of CP's grain performance from the Ag Transport Coalition, CP will share our aggregate empty car placement information on a weekly basis until the system is fully restored. Last week, empty car placements to Prairie elevators were 4,149 cars, which is a 10 percent increase in Week 32 vs. the previous week. With the onset of spring, we expect grain numbers to continue improving, and they'll improve still more when the Port of Thunder Bay opens, likely later this month. Much Manitoba grain is currently shipping all the way to Vancouver, which causes longer transit times and slower car turns vs. Thunder Bay.
  • CP is closely watching the emerging flooding threat across our network as snow begins to melt. We will strategically place material and equipment at yards as necessary so we're prepared to shore up or repair our roadbeds should conditions warrant it. CP's avalanche monitoring and control program continues to work closely with all stakeholders through B.C.'s main mountainous transportation corridor. Working with BC Highways and Parks Canada in all avalanche control activities, and constantly monitoring present and forecasted weather conditions that may adversely affect the corridor to ensure timely, efficient and safe movement of freight.
  • Overall volume this crop year remains 3% higher than at this time in 2017, an increase of approximately 450,000 metric tonnes.
  • The rolling four-week average is down 6% versus last year (heavily skewed by very low shipment totals in Week 30 on account of severe weather and network disruptions).
  • As volumes increase on both CP and CN, it is critical that terminals in Vancouver operate 7/24 and that the supply chain works together to manage overall throughput.
​​Week 31, February 25 - March 31,207
258,072
19,493
11,849
106,316
396,937
  • Shipments rose 16% in Week 31 over a very challenging Week 30. More encouragingly, overall empty placements improved by 49% in Week 31 compared to the week prior, with strengthening numbers near the end of the week. This increase occurred even as weather events continued to impact operations, including record snowfall in southern and central Alberta (March 2-3), and two minor derailments in Alberta caused service interruptions.
  • Our rolling four-week average is 4% below last year, reflective of the weather and other challenges that have created issues for the entire transportation supply chain for much of February. These short-term challenges are episodic, not systemic, and impact all commodity movements, not just grain.
  • Despite the ongoing challenges, CP is regaining its velocity, with train speeds up this past week by approximately 10% compared to mid-February. As weather moderates across our network, CP expects this momentum to continue, and for grain shipments to continue climbing.
  • CP continues to experience unprecedented and unexpected demand being driven from dual-rail-served territories in the northern catchment areas of our network. In spite of significant weather challenges, our shipments are up 30 percent crop-year to date in this area. We continue to deliver overall for the grain supply chain with our year-to-date shipments, through Week 31, up 3 percent, or approximately 400,000 metric tonnes. We strategically plan each year for the upcoming crop, which this year was originally forecast around 65 million metric tonnes, but will end up being closer to 71 million metric tonnes, close to a 10 percent difference.
​​Week 30, February 18 - 24 270
205,122
41,723
3,907
92,126
343,148
  • CP is experiencing unprecedented and unexpected demand being driven from dual-rail-served territories in the northern catchment areas of our network. In spite of significant weather challenges, our shipments are up 30 percent crop-year to date in this area. We continue to deliver overall for the grain supply chain with our year-to-date shipments, through Week 30, up 3 percent, or approximately 470,000 metric tonnes.
  • We strategically plan each year for the upcoming crop, which this year was originally forecast around 65 million metric tonnes, but will end up being closer to 71 million metric tonnes, close to a 10 percent difference.
  • On top of the increased crop size, weather and other challenges have created issues for the entire transportation supply chain over the last couple of weeks, these short-term challenges are episodic, not systemic, and we expect our network to improve with improving weather conditions. It is also worth noting that extreme weather and line outages impact all commodity movements, not just grain.
  • We continue to add both crews and locomotives to support volumes across all commodities and are confident that with the weather on our side, service and network fluidity will continue to improve.
  • All hands are on deck at CP as we work to meet the needs of our customers and the North American economy.
  • Shipments decreased by 25% week over week.
  • The rolling four-week average is 1% higher versus last year.
​​Week 29, February 11 - 1713,520
339,453
6,642
1,723
96,708
458,046
  • Shipments increased by 6% week-over-week and overall volume is 4% higher crop-year to date. Rolling four week average is 3% versus last year
  • Expect challenges related to avalanches and network outages to compound in Week 30 with a reduction of cars spotted at elevators in the country, as we have encountered several service disruptions in the west corridor over the past three weeks due in part to comparatively severe winter (46 percent* colder system-wide as compared to last year and a 167 percent* increase in days below -25 C). In British Columbia and Alberta we saw snowfall records for the entire month of February shattered by the middle of the month, in one event early in February a track section received 50 cm of snow over a 30-hour period leading to challenges for the entire transportation supply chain. Adverse weather has impacted the entire supply chain, including significant highway closures (in addition to rail closures) all through BC's mountain passes for avalanches and avalanche control
  • At -25 C and colder, we must take additional steps such as reducing train speeds and train lengths in order to continue to move products to destination in a safe, efficient manner. We encourage our customers to also take the time to ensure that their facilities and operations are winter ready
  • While these challenges are not uncommon across the Class 1s at this time, working with our strategic partners and our valued customers we are 100% focused on addressing these issues and on making operational decisions that will have us running optimally as quickly as possible
  • The frigid winter conditions have affected all commodities 
  • This year, based on weather and commodity forecasts, we have increased the size of our locomotive fleet and we continue to aggressively hire field employees – across all positions
  • Port of Thunder Bay remains closed for winter season
* Previously, it said that this winter was 60 percent colder and had 78 percent more days below -25 Celsius, that calculation was actually based on a subset of the network. In fact, for the period of Dec. 20, 2017 to Feb. 4, 2018, system-wide it was 46 percent colder (or approx. 6 degrees colder on average) with 167 percent more days below -25 Celsius (or approx. an additional 10 days below -25C during that period, as compared to the previous year).
​​Week 28, February 4 - 100
293,551
22,268
13,160
101,699
430,678
  • Winter storms in the Western Region caused a number of snow slides, which impacted train operations. This resulted in delays to trains enroute to Vancouver, plus staging of trains at Prairie elevators. Despite this, CP moved more tonnage this year than last during this week
  • We continue to follow our winter operating protocols. These include reduced train operations to allow for avalanche control in the mountains of British Columbia. These steps will impact car supply for country loading during Week 29 while car cycles start to recover
  • Shipments decreased by 8.8% week over week
  • Overall volume is 4% higher crop-year over crop-year
  • The rolling four-week average is flat compared to last year
​​Week 27, January 28 - February 39,637
284,867
50,995
16,719
110,192
472,410
  • Shipments increased by 21.3% from the previous week
  • A recent arbitration ruling in a labour case involving workers at the Port of Vancouver prohibits certain vessel-loading activity during rainfall events. This has caused some delays in loading at Vancouver terminals
  • We continue to move more grain than last crop year, with 4% increase in the crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • The rolling four-week average is down 7% versus last year
  • The Port of Thunder Bay remains closed for winter season
​​Week 26, January 21 - 271,352
252,183
33,665
13,603
88,412
389,215
  • We continue to move more grain than the last crop year, with 4% more volume delivered year-to-date compared to the same period a year prior
  • The rolling four-week average stands 7% below the same period last year
  • Volume remains heavily focused towards the Port of Vancouver
  • A recent arbitration ruling in a labour case involving workers at the Port of Vancouver prohibits certain vessel-loading activity during rainfall events. This has caused some delays in loading at Vancouver terminals
  • The Port of Thunder Bay is now closed for the winter, reducing options for Canadian export grain
​​Week 25, January 14 - 209,897
257,627
24,590
15,090
109,426
416,630
  • We continue to move more grain than the last crop year, with volumes up 4% over the same period a year prior
  • Volumes increased 6.8% vs. last week
  • Rolling four-week average is 9% less than same period last year 
  • Volume is heavily focused towards the Port of Vancouver 
  • The Port of Thunder Bay is now closed for the winter, reducing options for Canadian export grain
​​Week 24, January 7 - 13366
302,606
17,489
2,851
66,788
390,100
  • Winter operating conditions across the network; CP winter operating plan is in effect to help deal with colder conditions across the prairies
  • Overall shipments for the crop year are 5% above last year's pace
  • Rolling four-week average is down 7% versus last year
  • The Port of Thunder Bay is now closed for the winter, reducing options for Canadian export grain
​​Week 23, December 31 - January 65,278
243,645
44,871
4,050
111,574
409,418
  • A rebound occurred in Week 23 following the holiday period. Port terminals were closed for the New Year holiday, which did have some effect on volumes
  • The closure of the St. Lawrence Seaway through the winter has reduced overall grain demand on the system, with minimal volumes to the Port of Thunder Bay until reopening this spring
  • Shipments increased by 20.6% from the previous week  
  • Shipments are 5% higher in the crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • The rolling four-week average is up 8% versus last year
​​Week 22, December 24 - December 3033,280
198,161
36,480
1,805
69,540
339,266
  • CP continues to move grain volumes ahead of last year's pace across the network
  • The rolling four-week average is higher by 10% from last year
  • Overall shipments are up 5% in the crop year to date compared with the same period
  • Volumes last week were lower as holiday closures at port terminals and at country loading facilities reduced working capacity by approximately 40%
  • Extreme cold on the Canadian Prairies last week also impacted CP operations as well as the ability of some customers to load cars placed for loading in the country
  • The closure of the St. Lawrence Seaway through the winter has reduced overall grain demand on the system with minimal volumes to the Port of Thunder Bay until re-opening this spring
​​Week 21, December 17 - December 2366,105
391,046
39,034
2,240
112,904
611,329
  • CP, in close consultation with our customers, set another record in Week 21. We closed out the week well ahead of last year's pace, and operations remain fluid and efficient
  • An excellent 2017/2018 crop-year continues for CP, with shipments 6% higher year-to-date compared with the same period last year
  • Shipments increased by 5% over the previous week
  • Shipments in Week 21 were up 20% over the corresponding week last year
  • Four-week rolling average is 15% higher versus last year
​​Week 20, December 10 - December 16157,412
274,984
22,345
13,168
113,251
581,160
  • CP's network continues to operate efficiently while handling grain volumes substantially above last year's levels
  • Shipments increased by 1% from the previous week  
  • Shipment variance is 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is up 11% versus last year
​​Week 19, December 3 - December 9118,961
329,919
3,164
1,580
120,603
574,227
  • CP's network is fluid with volumes at normal levels
  • Shipments increased by 14% from the previous week
  • Shipment variance is 5% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is flat versus last year
​​Week 18, November 26 - December 2178,655
202,177
10,848
3,702
109,258
504,640
  • The aftermath of last week’s slides in British Columbia continued to affect volumes in Week 18. However, overall volumes remain strong, and throughput rose late in the week as operations normalized. Meanwhile, we are seeing very strong volumes building for Thunder Bay terminals
  • Shipments decreased by 13% from the previous week
  • Shipment variance is 4% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 1% higher versus last year
​​Week 17, November 19 - November 25187,741
276,227
17,353
1,209
98,922
581,452
  • Overall, a much stronger week than Week 16 as the network continued to recover from the B.C. outage. This week's performance would have been even better if not for landslides in the Fraser Valley, which cut off all rail traffic and reduced car supply to the port
  • Shipments increased by 25% from the previous week
  • Shipment variance is 4% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 3%  higher versus last year
​​Week 16, November 12 - November 1896,917
270,290
4,666
854
92,533
465,260
  • Vancouver-destined grain continued to experience delays as the CP network recovered from the British Columbia derailment in Week 15. We are now well into the recovery process, and look forward to a return to normal operating conditions
  • Shipments decreased by 20% from the previous week, almost entirely due to the derailment and subsequent service interruption
  • Shipment variance remains 5% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 2% higher versus last year
​​Week 15, November 5 - November 11145,395
322,114
8,218
5,553
102,790
584,070
  • With harvest complete, volumes remain at historically high levels
  • This week's numbers reflect some impact from a derailment in a strategically challenging location in British Columbia late on the evening of Nov. 9. The incident did not involve dangerous goods, nor did it result in any injuries or public safety issues. CP expects to see further impacts from this incident in Week 16
  • Shipments increased by 3% from the previous week
  • Shipment variance has increased to 6% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 10% higher versus last year
​​Week 14, October 29 - November 4174,195
306,337
12,963
3,248
72,504
569,247
  • CP continues to move grain on pace with the previous two months, the strongest eight-week period for volume shipments in company history
  • Shipments dipped 3% from the previous week's record-setting volume
  • Shipment variance remains 5% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 3% higher versus last year
​​Week 13, October 22 - October 28160,692
304,603
5,032
1,142
113,552
585,021
  • CP moved more Canadian grain this October than any October prior. That record follows an all-time monthly record in September.  The shipping demand we're seeing this fall is strong, and we're handling it efficiently in close consultation with our supply-chain partners. There's a lot to be proud of here for everyone involved
  • Harvest is now substantially complete. The pace of shipments remains very high. We continue to make on-time deliveries of empty railcars to country elevators
  • We are seeing improved fluidity at the Port of Vancouver
  • Shipments decreased by 1% from the previous week
  • Shipment variance is 5% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 2%  higher versus last year
     
​​Week 12, October 15 - October 21138,480
359,018
8,957
653
86,362
593,470
  • Grain movements are continuing at a very rapid pace as the harvest wraps up. CP is turning cars quickly despite wildfires in the western prairies and some vessel space limitations at the Port of Vancouver
  • Average car cycle times have risen slightly due to longer average hauls, with soybeans harvested in Manitoba being shipped through the Port of Vancouver
  • Shipments increased by 13% from the previous week  
  • Shipment variance is 5% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 7%  higher versus last year 
​​Week 11, October 8 - October 1488,171
339,863
14,174
1,890
78,712
522,810
  • Grain continues to move at historically high levels, even as volumes are down from their recent record pace. We remain relatively current on demand for loading in the country
  • Some port terminals at the Port of Vancouver are continuing to operate with tight space caused by recent vessel delays which has reduced unload capability causing some trains to be held at origin
  • Demand for movement to the west coast continues to increase from territory further east from the port increasing length of haul
  • Overall shipments decreased by 14% from the previous week
  • Shipment variance is 5% higher crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 1%  higher vs. last year
​​Week 10, October 1 - October 7105,567
407,424
4,560
1,736
91,538
610,825
  • Volumes remain very strong as the harvest nears completion, even as they are down from the prior week's historic pace
  • While Week 10 shipments decreased by 20% from the previous week, shipments were still 6% higher than the same week in 2016, and at 610,825 metric tonnes, represented the third-strongest week crop-year to date
  • Factors that affected volumes in Week 10 include a CP track outage due to a derailment in western Saskatchewan (no injuries/public safety issues), as well as tight terminal space in Vancouver
  • Shipment variance is 7% higher crop-year-to-date compared with the same period last year
  • The rolling four-week average is 9% higher versus last year
​​Week 9, September 24 - September 30171,516
425,189
9,984
2,657
129,126
738,472
  • Working closely with our customers, CP loaded more grain cars during the month of September than any month in our history. This is an accomplishment that everyone in the supply chain should be proud of
  • Week 9 was the best week on record, since CP began tracking Western Canadian grain and grain product weekly tonnages after the 2013-14 crop-year
  • Cool, wet weather has slowed the harvest in some parts of the Prairies
  • Some terminal delays at loading and unloading points have occurred in the past week, specifically on the West Coast
  • Shipments Increased by 31% from the previous week   
  • Shipment variance is 7% higher crop-year-to-date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 10% higher versus last year 
​​Week 8, September 17 - September 23159,970
301,831
9,991
805
90,634
563,231
  • After softer loadings at the beginning of the month due to slow deliveries from field to elevator, and delays around Labour Day, CP's grain supply chain is now fully charged. Empty hopper placements in the country the past two weeks have occurred at an all-time record pace
  • We are loading 5% above last year's pace crop-year over crop-year
  • Terminal space at the Port of Vancouver tightened last week due to gaps in vessel arrival at the port
  • Thunder Bay volumes remain very strong, above forecasted levels
​​Week 7, September 10 - September 16231,086
292,033
13,588
5,772
117,742
660,221
  • The harvest continues to trend ahead of the five-year average across the majority of the western prairies despite cooler and wetter conditions over the seven-day period. Shippers are not expecting any major delays in deliveries, and there is ample supply of product due to strong harvest progress so far this crop year
  • From a loadings perspective, the past grain week was:

    Second-biggest loading week in the last three crop years
    37% bigger than grain Week 6
    7% higher crop-year-to-date than the same period last year
  • The rolling four-week average is now 20% higher than last year
  • Volumes to Thunder Bay in particular are very strong. Terminals in Vancouver have been unloading well. Terminal space at the Port of Vancouver has tightened from previous weeks
​​Week 6, September 3 - September 9131,021
242,881
10,132
12,870
84,132
481,036
  • Shipments decreased by 14% from the previous week. All grain terminals at the Port of Vancouver were closed on Monday, Sept. 4, which reduced throughput
  • Shipments are up 5% crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average is 14% higher versus last year
​​Week 5, August 27 - September 2132,674
317,608
6,325
1,667
102,763
561,037
  • Shipments increased by 11% from the previous week
  • Shipments are up 5% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four week average is 13% higher than last year
​​Week 4, August 20 - 2699,433
277,679
10,881
1,012
117,046
506,051
  • Shipments increased 26% from the previous week
  • Shipment variance is up 2% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling four-week average was 4% higher than last year
​​Week 3, August 13 - 1969,914
224,765
8,950
2,933
94,730
401,292
  • Shipments decreased by 3% from the previous week
  • Shipment  variance is -10%  in the crop-year to date compared with the same period last year
  • Rolling 4 week average is -27% versus last year due to lower demand
​​Week 2, August 6 - 12113,172
190,071
5,573
2,331
101,000
412,147
  • Shipments increased by 5% from the previous week
  • The four-week rolling average was 20% lower than last year due to lower demand
​​Week 1, July 30 - August 599,430
154,180
5,346
2,848
96,811
358,615
  • Shipments decreased by 8% from the previous week
  • The four-week rolling average was 27% lower than last year

​​2016 - 2017 crop year

​​Metric Tonnes​​​​
​​Week 52, July 23 - 2962,051
248,035
10,430
2,096
65,489
388,101
  • Shipments decreased by 14% from the previous week
  • Shipments were flat in the 2016-2017 crop-year compared with the 2015-2016 crop-year.  The four-week rolling average was 18% higher than last year's pace
​Week 51, July 16 - 22132,711
182,261
8,019
2,131
105,254
430,376
  • Shipments increased by 8.3% from the previous week
  • Shipments are flat in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 16% higher than last year's pace
​​​Week 50, July 8 - 15140,098
161,522
15,830
2,849
​76,925
397,224
  • Shipments decreased by 6% from the previous week 
  • Volumes are almost identical to the same period in the 2015 - 16 crop year.  The four-week rolling average is 20% higher than last year's pace
​​Week 49, July 2 - 7102,079
206,099
2,559
2,103
109,556
422,396
  • Shipments decreased by 20.9% from the previous week. The holiday weekend impacted demand in the country at the start of the week. Loading this past week was reduced by customers to account for planned maintenance of a port terminal the week upcoming
  • Shipments are the same for the crop year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 30% higher than last year
​Week 48, June 25 - July 1142,256
265,444
13,644
1,290
111,537
534,171
  • Shipments increased by 7.6% from the previous week
  • Shipments are flat in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 27% higher than last year
​​​Week 47, June 18 - 24135,289
287,821
16,716
3,313
​53,303
496,442
  • Shipments decreased by 15.4% from the previous week  
  • Shipments are down 1%  in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 28% higher than last year
​​Week 46, June 11 - 17117,327
​339,914
15,402
5,245
109,313
587,201
  • Shipments increased by 17.5% from the previous week
  • Shipments are down 1% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 20% higher than last year's record-setting pace
​Week 45, June 4 - 10103,513
322,431
5,990
5,215
62,650
499,799
  • Shipments increased by 3% from the previous week
  • Shipments are down 2% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 11% higher than last year's record-setting pace
​​​Week 44, May 28 - June 3104,385
297,626
6,142
2,079
​74,298
​484,530
  • Shipments increased by 34% from the previous week
  • Shipments are down 2%  in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 14% higher than last year's record-setting pace
​​Week 43, May 21 - May 2782,208
​188,488
4,542
1,497
84,417
361,152
  • Shipments decreased by 15% from the previous week. Significant loading delays are occurring throughout the country as seeding progresses, and also due to the Victoria Day holiday on Monday. 
  • Shipments are down 3%  in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 10% higher than last year's record-setting pace
​Week 42, May 14 - 20 88,356
222,970
​9,544
2,026
103,352
426,248
  • Shipments decreased by 12% from the previous week.  This variance is primarily attributed to the reduced supply of product to the elevators from the field (due to seeding) resulting in loading delays
  • Shipments are down 3% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 15% higher than last year's record-setting pace
​​​Week 41, May 7 - 13121,020
284,356
4,363
2,696
​70,878
​483,313
  • Shipments decreased by 17% from the previous week.  The variance is primarily attributed to reduced supply of product to the elevators from the field (due to seeding), resulting in loading delays
  • Shipments are down 3%  in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier.  The four-week rolling average was 23% higher than last year's record-setting pace
​​Week 40, April 30 - May 6154,846
​357,762
4,552
3,090
62,088
582,338
  • Shipments were flat compared to the previous week (down 0.6%).  Shipments are down 4% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 21% higher than last year's record-setting pace
  • Empty spotting was strong, despite a major terminal being shut down for maintenance for 48 hours
  • Some loading delays in the country, mainly due to a reduced supply of product to the elevators from the field (due to seeding)
​Week 39, April 23 - 29 120,152
370,287
​16,193
1,837
70,635
579,104
  • Shipments decreased 7% from the previous week.  Shipments are down 4.2% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 16% higher than last year's record-setting pace
  • In Week 39 a total of 579,104 MT were billed, this represents a 11% year-over-year increase over Week 39 last year
  • Total loadings of Western Canadian Grain and Grain Products in April were at an all-time high for the month, while loadings to Vancouver in April were the best ever, for any month
​​​Week 38, April 16 - 22173,101
372,173
3,633
1,780
​72,356
​623,043
  • Week 38 was our best performing week, by volume, of the crop-year to date as shipments increased .5% from the previous record week.  Shipments are down 4.6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 12.9% higher than last year's record-setting pace
  • In Week 38 a total of 623,043 MT were billed, a 42% year-over-year increase over Week 38 2016 
  • Port of Thunder Bay remains fluid as the volumes in the supply chain are increasing
  • Due to Easter Sunday statutory holiday closure at the Port of Vancouver, CP recorded zero unloads on April 16
Week 37, April 9 - 15170,608
​356,275
14,163
1,749
77,249
620,044
  • Shipments increased 17% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 1% higher than last year's record-setting pace
  • Week 37 was our best performing week, by volume, of the crop-year to date
  • Port of Thunder Bay is fully operational and the supply chain was fluid for the week
  • Terminal space at some West Coast facilities is tightening due to rain, which could impact ability to ship to vessel
​Week 36, April 2 - 8 154,765
292,799
​3,282
1,225
77,321
529,392
  • Shipments decreased 5% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 6% lower than last year's record-setting pace
​​​Week 35, March 26 - April 168,826
375,106
35,110
1,670
​75,651
​556,363
  • Shipments increased 13% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 7% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Port of Thunder Bay is ramping up with the Seaway open and vessels loading
  • CP and its supply chain partners continue to perform well at the Port of Vancouver, with overall volumes to the port in line with last year's record pace and up 13.4% versus the three-year average
  • Terminal space is recovering after recent heavy rainfall at the Port of Vancouver
​​Week 34, March 19 - 2566,070
​327,942
​32,765
2,314
62,447
491,538
  • Shipments increased 8% from the previous week. Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 7% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Port of Thunder Bay is ramping up as the Seaway opens and vessels begin loading
​Week 33, March 12 - 18 39,353
287,804
​46,514
6,465
74,369
454,505
  • Shipments increased 2% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 8% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • A lengthy outage (of a partner foreign railway) negatively impacted supply chain
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to winter conditions
​​​Week 32, March 5 - 1112,024
310,444 ​​40,720
11,098
​70,596
​444,882
  • Shipments decreased 3% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 4% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Rain at Vancouver limited shipping at some export facilities at the Port of Vancouver impacting the ability of some facilities to unload railcars
  • A significant winter storm in Manitoba and South Eastern Saskatchewan impacted operations.
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to winter conditions
​​Week 31, February 26 - March 452,813​290,438​40,4562,06070,613456,380
  • Shipments increased 5% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 5% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure 
  • Lower Mainland weather limited ability to ship to vessel, impacting terminal space at some port facilities
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to winter conditions
​Week 30, February 19 - February 25 27,803273,041​40,5311,11791,003433,495
  • ​Shipments decreased 3% from the previous week. Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 8.5% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure 
  • CP operations continue to improve across our network after a series of rock slides and weather-related issues impacted the western corridor during Grain Week 28​
​​​Week 29, February 12 - 181,421334,925 ​​23,2102,288​84,024​445,868
  • Shipments increased 18% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 5.2% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • CP operations have improved across our network after a series of rock slides and weather-related issues impacted the western corridor during Grain Week 28
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure ​
​​Week 28, February 5 - 111,980​272,819​38,0462,68763,111378,643
  • Shipments decreased 15% from the previous week. Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 5.9% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Avalanches and other winter events created challenges in the mountain region, affecting CP's ability to move grain both east and west. These events are episodic in nature. Overall, the broader supply chain system continues to perform well
  •  Lower Mainland weather limited ability to ship to vessel, impacting terminal space at some port facilities
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure​
​Week 27, January 29 - February 4 15,971291,255​37,5611,77089,611436,168
  • Shipments decreased 3% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 4.7 lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • As a result of operational changes implemented in conjunction with our customers, we continue to see improvements with pulling and spotting of traffic at the Port of Vancouver. Customers have also commented on the positive benefits of CP's operational changes
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure
  • A derailment (of a partner foreign railway) in the Lower Mainland impacted flow of traffic in and out of the port
  • Winter storms impacting ability of some terminals to ship to vessel
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to winter conditions
​​​Week 26, January 22 - 2810,602​281,250​67,6353,754​85,074​448,315
  • Shipments decreased 2% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 1.6% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • As a result of operational changes implemented in conjunction with our customers, we continue to see improvements with pulling and spotting of traffic at the Port of Vancouver. Customers have also commented on the positive benefits of CP's operational changes
  • A barge in the Lower Mainland struck a bridge which temporarily impacted the flow of traffic in and out of the port
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure 
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to winter conditions​
​​​Week 25, January 15 - 21​24,589​331,622​32,326​2,724​67,167​458,428
  • Shipments increased 2% from the previous week. Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 3.8% lower than last year's record-setting pace 
  • Continue to see improvement with pulling and spotting of traffic at the Port of Vancouver aligning with changes implemented in conjunction with our customers
  • A partner foreign railway continued to have significant outages delaying the movement of empty and loaded grain   
  • ​Heavy rain during the week reduced shipping capability at some port facilities delaying the offloading of railcars and slowing the movement from prairie origin points
  • Port of Thunder Bay is currently operating at minimal levels due to seaway closure 
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to winter conditions
​​ ​Week 24, January 8 - 14 27,807​324,333​17,0182,67976,691448,528
  • ​Shipments increased 17% from the previous week. Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 2.1% higher than last year's record-setting pace
  • Working closely with customers, implemented operational changes and improved performance with spotting and pulling of traffic at the Port of Vancouver​
  • A Jan. 12 derailment in British Columbia led to an outage of approximately 24 hours. While re-routing options were quickly in place, the incident did impact the flow of loads and empties to the Port of Vancouver
  • A partner foreign railway had a significant outage starting Jan. 10 that also dela​yed the movement of empty and loaded grain  
  • With main seaway closure, Thunder Bay now operating at a minimal level
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to weather conditions across the network​
​​ ​Week 23, January 1 - 7​20,296​276,764​4,423​1,448​80,482​​383,413
  • ​Shipments decreased 11% from the previous week.  Reduced loadings were the direct result of holiday terminal closures
  • On New Year's Day no export facilities were available for unloading after working reduced shifts on December 31. On January 2 a number of export facilities continued to be closed or had reduced work schedules from normal operations
  • Country shipping was also reduced during this timeframe
  • Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier. The four-week rolling average was 2.3% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • CP continues to work with its supply chain partners to improve the pulling and spotting of cars in West Coast terminals
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to weather conditions across the network
​​Week 22, December 25 - 31​68,419​247,950​48,132​1,213​64,751​430,465
  • ​Shipments decreased 15% from the previous week, due to slower loading over the holiday week
  • The reduction in shipments was not related to a lack of car supply. In fact, in Week 21 and 22, CP placed a record number of empty cars (14% more than the same period in 2015 – the previous record)
  • Between December 24 and January 2, due to holiday closures, West Coast terminals reduced shifts by an average of 38% versus normal operations. In Thunder Bay, terminals reduced the number of shifts by 50% versus normal operations.  In total, 89 fewer shifts were worked at the export terminals over this holiday period
  • Holiday closures at country loading facilities reduced country loadings during this timeframe
  • Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier, due in part to the weather-delayed late harvest as well as the recent plunge in temperatures across the prairies. The four-week rolling average was 9.4% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to weather conditions across the network
​Week 21, December 18 - 24 ​114,711​291,035​26,3101,57574,453​508,084
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
  • Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments increased 10% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier, due in part to the weather-delayed late harvest as well as the recent plunge in temperatures across the prairies. The four-week rolling average was 10.5% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to weather conditions across the network
  • CP's country loadings continue to align closely with operating plan while we work to improve pulling and spotting of traffic at the Port of Vancouver
  • Port grain terminals started to work reduced shifts for the holiday season reducing unloads and slowing the flow of traffic from the prairies​
​Week 20, December 11 - 17​108,728​249,760​15,683​2,962​83,854​​460,987
  • ​Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments slipped 8% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 8% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier, due in part to the weather-delayed late harvest as well as the recent plunge in temperatures across the prairies. The four-week rolling average was 14% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Temperatures dropped below -25 degrees Celsius across western Canada during the week, while significant accumulations of snow throughout the network affected operations. Snow and colder than normal temperatures on the West Coast also impacted unloads. CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to these conditions​
  • There were no major issues with country loading and CP continues to work with its supply chain partners to improve the pulling and spotting of cars in West Coast terminals 
​​​ ​Week 19, December 4 - 10 ​166,923​255,930​6,556​1,77368,024​​​499,206
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
  • Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments slipped 1.4% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 7.5% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier, due in part to the weather-delayed late harvest as well as the recent plunge in temperatures across the prairies. The four-week rolling average was 10% lower than last year’s record-setting pace
  • Temperatures dropped below -25 degrees Celsius across western Canada during the week, while significant accumulations of snow in parts of Manitoba, North Dakota and British Columbia also affected operations. CP has implemented its Winter Operating Plan in response to these conditions
  •  There were no major issues with country loading and CP continues to work with its supply chain partners to improve the pulling and spotting of cars in West Coast terminals  
     
​Week 18, November 27 -
December 3
​158,879​247,466​4,069​6,40789,579​​​506,400
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
  • ​​​Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments decreased 11.3% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier due to the weather-delayed late harvest. The four-week rolling average was 5.3% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • No major issues with country loading
  • Low crop quality continues to present challenges in efficient supply chain handling
  • While space remains tight at some West Coast terminals, CP and its supply chain partners continue to focus on increasing velocity and improving fluidity in and out of Vancouver ​
​​Week 17, November 20-26​169,060​307,845​11,255​2,113​80,624​570,897
  • Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments increased 3.3% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier due to the weather-delayed late harvest. The four-week rolling average was 9% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Customers are reporting improving flows of grain being delivered into the supply chain at the country elevators
  • Low crop quality continues to present challenges in efficient supply chain handling
  • ​While space remains tight at some West Coast terminals, CP and its supply chain partners continue to focus on increasing velocity and improving fluidity in and out of Vancouver ​
​​
Week 16, November 13-19​149,334​321,626​9,811​2,712​69,059​552,542
  • Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments increased 9.4% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier due to the weather-delayed late harvest. The four-week rolling average was 7% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • While weather impacted space at some West Coast facilities, delaying unloading and slowing trains, overall the supply ​chain performed well in Week 16 in moving significant volume
  • CP and its supply chain partners continue to focus on increasing velocity and improving fluidity out of Vancouver​
​Week 15, November 6-12137,133​​292,056​5,845​1,443​68,759​​505,236
  • ​​​Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments decreased 2.4% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier due to the weather-delayed late harvest. The four-week rolling average was 8% lower than last year's record-setting pace
  • Persistent rain continues to impact space at some West Coast facilities, delaying unloading and slowing trains
  • Unloads and empty departures out of Vancouver improved week-over-week as CP and its supply chain partners continue to focus on increasing velocity and improving fluidity out of Vancouver​
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
​​​Week 14, October 30-November 5​137,351​295,949​11,849​855​71,779​517,783
  • Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments decreased 11% from the preceding week
  • Shipments are down 7% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier due to the weather-delayed late harvest. The four-week rolling average was 1% lower than last year's record-setting pace. It is worth noting that Week 14 2015 was the best week of that crop year, by volume​
  • Persistent rain impacted space at some West Coast facilities, delaying unloading and slowing trains, leading some customers to delay loading in the country due to space concerns at the port
  • CP is focused on opportunities to increase velocity by more timely spotting at port terminals and empty car departures from the port to increase loadings in the country​
​​​Week 13, October 23-29​166,265327,271​10,768​2,772​77,122​584,198
  • ​Western Canadian grain and grain product shipments increased 14.2% from the preceding week
  • Shipments remain down 5% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier due to the weather-delayed late harvest, but the four-week rolling average was 8.2% higher than last year's record-setting pace
  • To the end of Week 13 (October 29), CP is on pace for record loadings in the month of October​
  • Customers are reporting improving flows of grain being delivered into the supply chain at the country elevators
  • Poor weather (rain and wind) is impacting some West Coast port terminals; delaying the unloading of railcars and causing trains to be slowed into the port
  • An October 25 derailment in B.C. temporarily disrupted the supply chain​
​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​
​Week 12, October 16-22​119,313​302,939​13,058​1,685​74,347​511,342
  • ​Western Canadian grain and grain products shipments fell 17.4% from the preceding week
  • Shipments remain down 6% in the crop-year to date compared with the same period a year earlier due to the weather-delayed late harvest, but the four-week rolling average – which smooths out short-term volatility from season to season – is 4% higher than last year's record-setting pace
  • ​Customers are reporting an improved flow of grain into the elevators, which helped drive stronger loading in the Prairies, though product blending is introducing complexities into the supply chain
  • Poor weather (rain and wind) is causing space issues at some port terminals as they are unable to ship to vessel, which is delaying the unloading of some railcars
  • Sub-optimal execution by CP in releasing unloaded empty cars from the ports back into the supply chain weighed on overall performance 
Week 11, ​October 9-15​​​166,450​​​399,364​​6,6532,12644,837619,430
  • up 7.4% week-over-week, down 6% year-over-year to date
  • Despite a successful week, supply chain challenges this week included:​​

    ​Poor weather (snow, sleet, rain and cold) continued to delay harvest progress across the Canadian Prairies​

    Wind and rain at the Port of Vancouver impacted unloading and slowed the overall supply chain​
​​ ​